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Asia Media Summit 2022

Government of Republic of Fiji is parterning with AIBD for upcoming first-ever virtual Asia Media Summit from 23-26 May 2022.

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Broadcasters were urged to preserve good content by digitising and managing it efficiently in order to share this valuable resource to future generations and enable companies to make some money.
 
“So much good content is stored in some offices and libraries of government agencies, private companies and broadcast organisations that unless this is digitised, it will simply vanish in three to five years,” Mr Sanajay Salil, Managing Director, MediaGuru, India, said in his presentation during the plenary session on “Monetising Content and Dealing with Copyright Issues” at the 13th Asia Media Summit on 26 May 2016 in Incheon, Korea.

Broadcasters were urged to preserve good content by digitising and managing it efficiently in order to share this valuable resource to future generations and enable companies to make some money.
 
“So much good content is stored in some offices and libraries of government agencies, private companies and broadcast organisations that unless this is digitised, it will simply vanish in three to five years,” Mr Sanajay Salil, Managing Director, MediaGuru, India, said in his presentation during the plenary session on “Monetising Content and Dealing with Copyright Issues” at the 13th Asia Media Summit on 26 May 2016 in Incheon, Korea.

Mr Salil cited efforts of the government of Qatar and the Times Group and Prasar Bharati of India in digitising their content and realised much benefit from this initiative.

Once content is digitised, he said, it is important to manage this resource, finding out what material to push and when, and in which format to be able to make the most of this asset.

Another speaker was Mr. Lain Martin, Asia Editor of Storyful, Hongkong. In his presentation, he said their platform gives clients the power to find the most engaging authentic and inspiring stories on the social web.

Storyful technology, he said, monitors the entire social web in realtime and alerts their journalists when something is happening 24/7.Their digital native journalists are anchored to the technology and trained to find stories that matter for brands, agencies and end consumers.

“Once content is discovered, their journalists verify authenticity, brand safety, proper attribution, location and overall situational context. Then they acquire the rights for partners to use and deliver content instantly to newsrooms and brands,” he said.

Broadcasters were urged to preserve good content by digitising and managing it efficiently in order to share this valuable resource to future generations and enable companies to make some money.
 
“So much good content is stored in some offices and libraries of government agencies, private companies and broadcast organisations that unless this is digitised, it will simply vanish in three to five years,” Mr Sanajay Salil, Managing Director, MediaGuru, India, said in his presentation during the plenary session on “Monetising Content and Dealing with Copyright Issues” at the 13th Asia Media Summit on 26 May 2016 in Incheon, Korea.

Dato’ Sri Ahmad Shabery Cheek, Minister of Communications and Multimedia of Malaysia, raised the possibility that  viewers might stop watching TV in the traditional sense unless broadcasters dealt seriously with new trends impacting their industry, among them; the rising popularity of over-the-top or OTT services, the reach and influence of  social media, and evolving media consumption behaviour.

Media’s power is enormous in today’s society. It can facilitate public debate and discussion and shape public opinion. Its influence extends to its role in development, setting an agenda it deems relevant to nation building. A media with a capacity and interest to report issues on national strategies, social justice and inclusion, social progress, environmental sustainability, and enabling regulatory environment can create wealth in society, develop people’s potential to pursue creative and productive lives, and contribute towards equity and equality for all people.

[img_assist|nid=1662|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=66]The Asia Media Summit has concluded  in Hanoi, contributing to a growing consensus that it was no longer business as usual for broadcasters in the battle for attention that has become more intense than ever in the digital world.

In his closing remarks, AIBD Director Yang Binyuan said the Summit has helped raise awareness and understanding among broadcasters of new and innovative ideas as well as opportunities offered by technological advances and multiple delivery platforms such as the web, mobile, and social media that will expand their audience reach, address strong competition and improve their products and services as well as business returns.

 

TV CONTENT FORMATS DEVELOPMENT 

Inspiration – Creativity - Innovation

In the framework of our collaboration with the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Regional Audiovisual Attaché based in Singapore at the French embassy, the AIBD has set up in 2009 a 3-year plan dedicated to TV content development only.2010 is the 2nd year of the plan offering 4 regional workshops.

All over the year 2010, professionals from VTV (Vietnam), MCOT (Thailand), GMA (Philippines), SCTV (Indonesia) and Media Prima (Malaysia) have explored how to design and produce short TV programme, Youth TV Programme, Entertainment TV Programme and Variety Show.

The media landscape in Bhutan offers many opportunities as well as challenges for those involved in reform.   For a country which introduced television as recently as 1999, and which until a couple of years ago had only one (state-owned) newspaper, the spurt in media-related activity, especially since the advent of popular democracy in 2008, has been striking.  It is not surprising, therefore, that attention has now turned to strengthening public service broadcasting in this Himalayan idyll.