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Asia Media Summit 2022

Government of Republic of Fiji is parterning with AIBD for upcoming first-ever virtual Asia Media Summit from 23-26 May 2022.

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Journalism is basically storytelling, telling the right facts, but this is not enough to attract audiences in the fast-changing world.

 

Former BBC news producer Sarah Gibson, President of the Worldwide Association of Women Journalists and Writers, says people want journalists to tell stories or narratives that engage them, and explain why these stories matter to them.

 

Audiences want stories that they care about, Ms Gibson said, otherwise they will leave you and look for more relevant stories.

 

Ms Gibson conducted the Masterclass on Storytelling, Principles, Methods and Aims as a pre-summit activity to the Asia Media Summit 2018 held in New Delhi from 8-9 May 2018.

 

In telling good stories, participants identified some of the challenges they face; these include the use of single or multiple platforms, types of innovative approaches to storytelling, lack of resources, dictates of concentrated media ownership, finding out who the audience is, how to build trust, and how to make breaking news more compelling.

 

Close to 30 delegates from 10 countries in Asia Pacific are participating in the two-day workshop AIBD organised with support from the China Central Television (CCTV).

 

In order to tell better stories, Ms Gibson urged broadcasters to get to know their audiences more, not only their gender, social class, geographical and cultural affiliation, but also where and how they consume diverse media platforms.

 

She said people are consuming information through radio and TV, live streaming, reading online, podcasts, and social media.

 

In the existing media structure, mainstream journalists are telling stories that are based on evidence and rational scrutiny to build trust among the people. But Ms. Gibson said in emergent media, people are looking for stories that are recognisably human,  they can like and connect with, and have cultural familiarity.

 

As audiences are getting younger, we are seeing a disconnect between  the demands in the existing and in emergent media. But we need to tell stories that have the components of both existing and emergent media perspectives. “ Both approaches are valid,” she said.

 

What are the basics of storytelling?

 

Gibson said as journalists we assume our audiences know too much. That may not be so. It’s important to present and explain basic facts to them.

 

It’s also vital, she said,  that we go back to basics by giving our audiences a strong lead and a strong peg.

 

“ We can also ask audiences what they want to know, what they want to talk about,” Gibson said.

 

Drawing from the BBC experience, Gibson said audiences now want to see that newsrooms feed the needs not only of their head, but also their heart. That means providing audiences trends, updating them with information, and offering perspectives. But more importantly, journalists should produce stories that are  inspiring, amusing and educating the audiences.

Another way to tell better stories is the solution-based journalism. Ms Gibson said young audiences now want to read and watch more stories that present solutions rather than problems.

 

“ People are saying  stop giving us problems, but give us solutions. Of course, we get people to account, but this is interpreted as negative and audiences see this as unhelpful. They need more solutions,” she said.

 

AIBD Director Chang Jin welcomed the participants saying this masterclass has become a  tradition supported by CCTV and other partners.

 

Two other resource persons are speaking in the masterclass; they are Mr Abhaya Kumar Padhi, author and media trainer from India, and Mr Yang Fuqing, Deputy Director, CGTN English, China.

The United Nations urges broadcasters in Asia Pacific to continue reporting on development issues, including the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), while promoting pluralism and diversity of views.

In a message to the 14th Asia Media Summit participants, Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations, stressed media’s critical role in engaging and inspiring people, connecting communities, as well as holding governments accountable.

The United Nations urges broadcasters in Asia Pacific to continue reporting on development issues, including the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), while promoting pluralism and diversity of views.

In a message to the 14th Asia Media Summit participants, Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations, stressed media’s critical role in engaging and inspiring people, connecting communities, as well as holding governments accountable.

Preamble:

Mindful of the pressing challenges facing our world, among them, poverty, conflict, socioeconomic inequality, environmental degradation and climate change that call for urgent and concerted action to accelerate development and progress in our society;

Noting that there are several creative and innovative mechanisms to achieve sustainable development, appropriate to every country’s own needs, expectations and pace of development, and demanding participation and support from government, private sector, civil society, local communities, families and individuals alike;

President Ali-Askari,
Director Chang Jin,
Distinguished Guests,
Ladies and Gentlemen,
Dear Friends,
Good morning!

In this lovely season of midsummer, flowers blooming like a piece of brocade. I’m delighted to come to the coastal city of Qingdao, with representatives from 48 countries and 7 international organizations, for the opening session of Asia Media Summit 2017. Let me begin by extending warm congratulations on the opening of the Summit. I’d like to convey sincere greetings and best wishes to all the distinguished guests coming from afar, as well as participants from the Film Capital Summit!

The ITU Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific says costs, enormity of task, lack of government support and cooperation among stakeholders, and ever evolving technologies remain as some of the challenges in the migration from analogue to digital in the region.

“Not only does the setup of infrastructure for digital but also carrying out a simulcast service for a given period involve a lot of money and resources. On top of these the need to subsidise set- top-boxes to masses is an additional burden,” said Mr Wisit Atipayakoon, Programme Officer of the ITU Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok before participants at the AIBD/ITU/ABU regional workshop on “Digital Terrestrial Broadcasting TV and Radio Policy and Transition,” on 5 June 2017 in Qingdao, China.

The use of virtual studio and virtual studio implantation technology is bringing a new visual experience for the TV audience, and providing new thinking and creative new tools for television producers.

They are applications of the virtual reality technology and are becoming a new trend in the broadcast industry in Asia Pacific, Mr Huang Lei, Product Manager, Jetsen Technology Co. Ltd, Beijing, said in his presentation at a pre-summit regional workshop on augmented reality on 4 June 2017 in Qingdao, China. The workshop is a partnership among AIBD, Jetsen Technology Co., Whaley, and Bang Productions.

For broadcasters to develop and sustain cutting-edge content, they must ensure it is interactive and produced and delivered on multi-screens. Such content must cater to more young people and also be part of the whole industrial chain.

This advice came from Mr Lv Peng, President of Shandong TV, China, who participated in the CEO Roundtable at the 13th Asia Media Summit on 26 May 2016 in Incheon, Korea

Audiences will have many screens to watch news anytime and anywhere, and to draw their attention, particularly the young, broadcast journalists must have a story to tell, one that offers accuracy, analysis, and expertise, and must help audiences make sense of it.

This approach is how BBC World Service has operated in the world, says Ms Francesca Unsworth, Director, World Serive Group, BBC, United KIngdom, emphasising that “content remains queen or king.”

Asian media is raising concerns about the ‘invasion’ of globalised content on various screens that threatens local content and may necessitate government regulation such as imposing a content quota system to preserve local cultures in the region.

In Bhutan, Bollywood programmes and Korean dramas and variety shows have invaded local content, says Kinley Dorji, a journalist and Secretary, Ministry of Information of Bhutan during the Moderated Debate at the 13th Asia Media Summit in Incheon, Korea.